St. Louis Video Production: Lifetime Media

Your Life Just Got Easier

Welcome to Lifetime Media, a St Louis video production company, that provides visual communications through the power of video. We are celebrating over 16 years in business and have the accolades, referrals and body of work to let you feel at ease that we can handle your project with great care, attention to detail and follow through with a video production that exceeds your expectations. We want to help you create a video that does its job...accomplishes your mission.

PSA: Cardinals For Life

Last week was a blast! We were honored to be apart of a very important discussion about health.

Check out some production photos below as we spent the day filming American Cancer Society's next PSA with Dexter Fowler of the St. Louis Cardinals.

#CardinalNation


STL Cardinals Manager, Mike Matheny sitting with the press.

STL Cardinals Manager, Mike Matheny sitting with the press.

 
American Cancer Society (Jason) shown in black with LTM crew member Kyle.

American Cancer Society (Jason) shown in black with LTM crew member Kyle.

 
 
American Cancer Society team

American Cancer Society team

 
 
LTM team with Cardinal's player Dexter Fowler.

LTM team with Cardinal's player Dexter Fowler.

Find out more about "ACS Day at The Ballpark" on facebook!

Read details below taken from the event page:
Join us this summer as we team up with the St. Louis Cardinals and help strike out cancer at the 5th annual American Cancer Society Day at the Ballpark. Last year we had approx. 16,000 volunteers who attended the day at the ballpark, and this year we expect even more. With your help we were able to raise close to $120,000 last year towards the fight against cancer, bringing our cumulative total to over 1/2 million dollars raised for the American Cancer Society.

Your purchase of a ticket gets you more than just a seat at the ballpark. You get the following:

- Reserved seat in the ballpark to watch the Cardinals win
- A free hot dog and soda voucher
- Entrance into the stadium for the EXCLUSIVE PREGAME activities (autograph sessions with current and alumni players, Kidzone activities, walking the field, and more)

YOU MUST PURCHASE A TICKET AT:
www.stlcardinalsrfl.org in order to participate in all the pre-game activities.

 

Summer 17'

Lifetime Media has been fired up this summer! Thanks for all of the great companies who continue to trust us with their professional video needs.

Behind the scenes with Lifetime Media Producer Kyle, in our Brentwood soundstage. 

Behind the scenes with Lifetime Media Producer Kyle, in our Brentwood soundstage. 

 
BTS with American Heart Association @ Barnes Jewish Hospital. (See previous post below titled "911, Whats your Emergency" for details on this live mock trial shoot!)

BTS with American Heart Association @ Barnes Jewish Hospital. (See previous post below titled "911, Whats your Emergency" for details on this live mock trial shoot!)

 
In studio filming with a representative of Concordia Seminary

In studio filming with a representative of Concordia Seminary

 
On set with Scrubs and Beyond

On set with Scrubs and Beyond

 
In studio with Pale Night Productions

In studio with Pale Night Productions

 
The LTM crew hard at work making sure we get the best shots! It was a tight squeeze but we made it work! (From previous post "911, What's your emergency")

The LTM crew hard at work making sure we get the best shots! It was a tight squeeze but we made it work! (From previous post "911, What's your emergency")

 
 
Al being extremely serious on set.

Al being extremely serious on set.

 
VP Abraham in the zone.

VP Abraham in the zone.


Thanks again for your business! We're looking forward to the next 6 months of 2017.

- The Lifetime Media Team

"You said there was a troll...I thought you were joking."

It was a normal, hot, and muggy Friday morning at Lifetime Media. Everyone was settled in their designated areas, and all projects were moving along as it should.

*ding dong* goes the doorbell

"Yes?.." asks the receptionist

A towering, brown, hairy, muscle beast troll lackadaisically approaches the door.

"Don't tell me I'm the first one here."


Pale Night Productions

We're living the fairy tale life at the Lifetime Media studio today! Since yesterday morning, we've seen trolls, wizards, and zombies, oh my! From the castle to the dungeon, we can always expect Pale Night Productions to bring something exciting to the table.

Take a look at what's happening right now!

Pale Night Productions @ Lifetime Media

Pale Night Productions @ Lifetime Media

 
 

All hands on deck!


Until next time Pale Night Productions! It's always a blast having you in studio.

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Follow us:

Instagram: @lifetimemediastl Twitter: @lifetime_Media

 

A Toy Story

Lifetime Media was a part of quite a nostalgic project. Thanks to Excelligence Learning Center and The Children's Toy Factory, we were asked to film the process of creating some amazing learning tools for kids; TOYS!

In a world full of cellphones, tablets, television, and video games, we were able to grasp the importance of a more "hands-on" product that help shape the mind of a growing child. The Excelligence Learning Corporation creates safe, fun, and quality products loved by children, teachers, and parents alike.

Take a look at some behind the scenes pics.

Interviewing VP of Sales- Equipment Division, Tim Lynch.

Interviewing VP of Sales- Equipment Division, Tim Lynch.

 
LTM at Children's Toy Factory filming the block stuffing process.

LTM at Children's Toy Factory filming the block stuffing process.

 
Bike building and wood station.

Bike building and wood station.

 
Children's Factory crew sewing fabric for soft toy blocks.

Children's Factory crew sewing fabric for soft toy blocks.

 
Interviewing VP of Marketing-Equipment Division, Kelly Madden

Interviewing VP of Marketing-Equipment Division, Kelly Madden

Thanks to the Children's Toy Factory of Union, Missouri for allowing us to be apart of sharing your story.

-Lifetime Media Team

"911, What's Your Emergency"

Lifetime Media recently teamed with American Heart Association and Barnes Jewish Hospital to film a real-time stroke simulation. With the help of Walgreens Pharmacy, the Northeast Ambulance and Fire Protection District , Barnes Jewish Hospital's attentive doctors, actors, and exceptional staff, we were able to thoroughly capture every moment of a stroke patient's emergency rescue. Here's a look at the scene.


Scene I:  Walgreens Pharmacy

Walgreens Pharmacy customer Michael Johnson (actor) arrives to make a purchase when he suddenly collapses to the floor.

 
Lifetime Media crew on the set of scene 1 for real-time stroke simulation @ Walgreens Pharmacy w/ actor Mr. Lee as stroke victim.

Lifetime Media crew on the set of scene 1 for real-time stroke simulation @ Walgreens Pharmacy w/ actor Mr. Lee as stroke victim.

 

EMT arrives on the scene to assist Michael upon receiving news of possible stroke.


Scene II: the road to recovery

Walgreens customer Michael Johnson has been diagnosed with a stroke. By the help of the Northeast Ambulance and Fire Protection District, he is then rushed to Barnes Jewish Hospital Emergency Department and admitted immediately .

 

Upon arrival, the patient is then rushed in for CT Scans.

 

scene III: THE space between

Patient Michael Johnson is being prepped for open heart surgery. In the meantime, Lifetime Media crew carefully map out their shot list, and discuss what is best for direction and efficiency.

 

scene IV: The OPErating room

It's time for surgery performed by Dr. Akash Knasagra M.D., M.S. of Barnes Jewish Hospital.

 

The surgery was a success! Dr. Akash wakes the patient to notify him of his successful surgery and wishing him a prosperous recovery.

 

That's a wrap!

It was another exciting shoot with Lifetime Media. We are honored to assist in such an important process of events. Be sure to learn all about living a healthy heart life by visiting the American Heart Association at: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/

Special thanks to: Barnes Jewish Hospital, American Heart Association, Walgreens Pharmacy, Northeast Ambulance and Fire Protection District, Lifetime Media, LLC, and videographers: Bernie Aniciete (videographer), Joey (Videographer), Trent (Videographer), CEO Eric Habert (videographer), Kyle Jefferey (Producer), Donovan (Videographer), Kyra Hannah (DIT), Bryan (Audio Tech), and Al Aro (videographer).

A Year In Review

A LOOK BACK AT 2016

It's been an exciting and busy year here at Lifetime Media! Here's a bit of a recap of just a few shoots we've done in the last few months.


 

The Blues Museum

 

Theological Series Talk Show

 

St. Louis Business Journal: Catapult Competition

 

Championship Productions

Indiana State University

Indiana State University

SIUE softball

SIUE softball

SIUE softball hitting training

SIUE softball hitting training

St. Louis Concert Choir

 

Cirque Du Soleil

 

We couldn't have asked for a better year and it's all because of you. Here's to bigger and better in 2017!


THANK YOU FOR A GREAT YEAR

- Lifetime Media Team

Lights, Camera, Action

One of the most exciting projects to shoot are live events. And we approach the holidays, many live events start rolling in. They're full of production value, prime networking opportunities, and a great source for new ideas and techniques. On the other hand, because you only get one shot and no "do-overs", they can be one of the most overwhelming projects if you aren't properly prepared for it.

Here are a few things to remember before lights, camera, action:


Be Prepared

 Lifetime Media preparing to shoot before arriving on site.

 Lifetime Media preparing to shoot before arriving on site.

What separates a live event from all others is your one chance to get it right. There are no cuts or re-dos, so it's best to prepare for all possible outcomes.

      1. Prepare for the worst- Make sure you have all of the necessary equipment to film the entire event. Pack extra batteries, mics, lens, and cords. Sometimes equipment can fail and there is not enough time to troubleshoot. Have a plan B and C ready for action.

      2.  Contact the venue ahead of time- Map out the location and give yourself some extra time just in case you get lost on the way there. It helps to visit the venue before shoot day.

      3. Have client contact on hand- Always keep your clients contact information with you. This goes without saying.

      4. Prepare a booking sheet for crew and client- Your booking sheet should have all of the primary information. This includes: time of shoot, location, arrival time, distance from one site to another, crew name and contact, venue contact, etc. You want to always be prepared, have your crew prepared, and reassure to your client that you take your job seriously.


Talk with client the week of event

    It's always a good idea to touch bases with your client the week of the event. You want to make sure all details are confirmed and squared away before shoot day. This is also a great time to get some extra questions answered that may not have been covered on the booking sheet.


  Make A List, Check It Twice

1. Shot List: It's often times very beneficial to create a shot list. Have an idea of what shots your clients "must have" and a list of B-roll shots. It doesn't hurt to also prepare a list of the proper equipment you made need for each shot. When all else fails, you can never have too much B-roll to save your project.

     2. Pick your style: Whether you want to go with a traditional tripod shot, multi-camera, on choosing a more cinematic approach with complex movement and lighting, make sure you have your idea set before you arrive. Most live events require lots of movement and interaction. It's best to mix it up a little. Never stop recording, know your client, find a soundboard, and always choose quality over convenience.


Arrive Early

Centene Corporation: CEO town hall meeting.

Centene Corporation: CEO town hall meeting.

  The day of the shoot can be a bit overwhelming if you're pressed for time. Make sure you prepare everything the night before, and arrive to the site early! Here at Lifetime Media, we make sure to arrive 1.5hrs before show time. This gives us time to set up, test audio and all equipment before guests arrive, grab a snack (you'll need it), etc. Once you have all of the essentials together and you're all set to record, make sure to build a relationship with vendors around you. Introduce yourself to the staff on site, venue manager, sound engineer (if one is present), the entertainment (band/artist/speaker), event planner, promoter, or any other person(s) involved with the event. Sometimes you're meeting these people for the first time. The night will go much easier if all vendors are comfortable with each other and work together to make sure the night goes as smoothly as possible. It also helps to have business cards handy. You never know who you will meet.


Limber Up

  Live events almost always go past the timeline. Be prepared to stand or sit long hours, skip meals, and fight exhaustion. Make sure you get a good night's sleep, stretch, pack a snack, and hydrate before show time. If you're traveling with a production crew, think of yourselves as a sports team. It's beneficial to not keep your players in the whole game, be sure to keep the team fresh by rotating players throughout the night.


Be A Team Player

Make A Wish Foundation

Make A Wish Foundation

    Make sure you bring a efficient team with you. Maybe you've contracted some crew members to help with the event. Make sure before the event takes place that you have the synergy needed to have a successful shoot. When you've been working with the same crew for some time, you begin to get familiar with their style, their equipment, their habits. A good team will go a long way. Know who's strengths will help with your weaknesses, and hold each other accountable. Team work makes the dream work.


Be Discreet

Loufest 2016; St. Louis, MO

Loufest 2016; St. Louis, MO

   In the previous blog post, we touched on great ways to be discreet during a live event. It's important to look presentable while also aiming to blend in. Make sure the guests and client are comfortable enough not to perform "staged." You want to make sure any and all subjects are as authentic as possible. [see previous post "Now You See Me Now You Don't"]


Pack Light

LTM crew on the go!

LTM crew on the go!

   Some event spaces require a long haul and lots of transporting. Make sure you pack the essentials so that you can move as freely as possible. Always remember, quality over quantity. Refer to your shot list and only bring what those shots require.


Social Media

   Make sure to take some behind the scenes photos and post them on your social media pages. So much is going on during the event and things can escalate quickly. Capturing a quick shot of the night for your clients, guests, and others to see after the night has passed can go a long way. Not only does it promote the event, it helps your clients gain positive feedback for their next one. Also, more social media followers don't hurt either. ;)


Enjoy The Experience

State Wars National Championship: Lifetime Media shot 900 games in 13 days

State Wars National Championship: Lifetime Media shot 900 games in 13 days

   You should always enjoy all the projects you take on! Some might be more work than others, but if you're doing what you love, it will always be a project you enjoy. Live events take a great deal of preparation, but the outcome is often worth it. Take some time during the event to soak in the moment, remember the experience, and use that to piece together an unforgettable video for your client to view now and years to come.

Have a great Thanksgiving!

First Person Shooter

As we continue to evolve, technology does also, and at an alarming rate.

The first film camera was pioneered by George Eastman called the "Kodak" in 1888.

The first film camera was pioneered by George Eastman called the "Kodak" in 1888.

 

The first video camera used for working motion picture was created by William Dickson (under the employment of Thomas Edison) in 1895.

"In 1879 At age 19 William Dickson wrote a letter to Thomas Edison trying to seek employment with the inventor. He was turned down. That same year Dickson, his mother, and two sisters moved from Britain to Virginia.[3] In 1883 he was finally hired to work at Edison's Menlo Park laboratory. In 1888, American inventor and entrepreneur Thomas Alva Edison conceived of a device that would do "for the Eye what the phonograph does for the Ear". In October, Edison filed a preliminary claim, known as a caveat, with the US Patent Office (which shut down 1932 in the great depression) outlining his plans for the device. In March 1889, a second caveat was filed, in which the proposed motion picture device was given a name, the Kinetoscope. Dickson, then the Edison company's official photographer, was assigned to turn the concept into a reality." -wiki

"In 1879 At age 19 William Dickson wrote a letter to Thomas Edison trying to seek employment with the inventor. He was turned down. That same year Dickson, his mother, and two sisters moved from Britain to Virginia.[3] In 1883 he was finally hired to work at Edison's Menlo Park laboratory. In 1888, American inventor and entrepreneur Thomas Alva Edison conceived of a device that would do "for the Eye what the phonograph does for the Ear". In October, Edison filed a preliminary claim, known as a caveat, with the US Patent Office (which shut down 1932 in the great depression) outlining his plans for the device. In March 1889, a second caveat was filed, in which the proposed motion picture device was given a name, the Kinetoscope. Dickson, then the Edison company's official photographer, was assigned to turn the concept into a reality." -wiki

The first video camera was created by John Logie Baired used in experimental broadcasts introducing the first purely electronic colour television beginning in the 1920s.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/see-the-first-tv-image-from-john-logie-bairds-early-televisor-demonstrations-a6834416.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/see-the-first-tv-image-from-john-logie-bairds-early-televisor-demonstrations-a6834416.html

As a videographer you're often asked "What kind/brand of camera do you use?"  I've always found that to be an interesting question. The painter isn't often asked "what type of brush did you use?" The singer isn't often asked "What kind of mic do you use?" The chef not often asked "what brand of oven do you typically cook with?" This is because your work is only as good as you make it to be.

From the box camera to the camera phone, we've come a long way. But your work isn't only based on the "quality" of your camera, or all of your nooks and crannies purchased along with it. The real tool, is the one behind the camera.

We've reached the last quarter of 2016 and we've seen a great deal of videos. Some of the most captivating videos were even shot and edited on cellphones. So what makes the fascination of camera's manufacturer so important? The simple answer is the shooter.

When testing out products, we see what we want others to see. You've got to give it your best shot (no pun intended) and use all of the resources you were given to make sure the job gets done.

This takes practice. Whether you're holding a Pentax, a Panasonic, or a phone, the only way to produce the best quality work is to continue to work. Shoot as much as you can, as often as you can, with as much creativity your camera allows. You will find that in the end, the quality of your work, begins and ends with you.

NOW YOU SEE ME NOW YOU DONT

When shooting events, big and small, your job is to capture the most desired and often the most overlooked moments of the night. From iconic speeches, to sold out shows, the video crew must make sure all ground is covered while making the most of the production value at hand. This means staying close to the subjects as much as possible but also being aware of your surroundings. Following your subjects with big bulky cameras and bright lights is old news (except under certain circumstances of course). With the latest technology, cameras, lights, and all of the accessories are getting smaller and smaller. But when using HQ professional video production cameras, being discreet turns into an art form.

Here at Lifetime Media we pride ourselves on our ability to be discreet. We know how important it is to assimilate to the subjects and their surroundings creating an atmosphere so comfortable that authenticity is no question. 

As a creative artist and producer, you begin with your finished product in mind. Your job is to put the pieces together to tell a story that produces what the client wants and also what you know the client needs that provides a reaction and a call to action. When doing this, it's important that you build a relationship with your client. Being able to know what makes them comfortable allows them to be their true self. When seeing the lights and cameras, a part of the subject wants to show who they want their viewers to see, and you want to show something deeper. You know how important it is to show the core of the company or organization you're representing and you want their message to be delivered as genuinely as possible.

"Most of us are at our most transparent self when we're alone or with the people we know. Knowing how to blend into the background and seem as though you were never there makes for a great way to observe your subject in their most comfortable element." - Lifetime Media CEO Eric Habert

"Most of us are at our most transparent self when we're alone or with the people we know. Knowing how to blend into the background and seem as though you were never there makes for a great way to observe your subject in their most comfortable element." - Lifetime Media CEO Eric Habert

We asked Lifetime Media Producer/DP Kyle Jeffery what's some additional tips on being discreet? 

I dress to fit into the audience. Also, before the event begins, I have a game plan with what the camera ops are doing and where they will be positioned. It’s never a good idea to just wing it.

Here's a Lifetime Media video of a large event for St. Louis Business Journal. We were able to blend into the crowd and effectively capture their event producing a video perfect for their needs.

St. Louis Business Journal / Mentoring Monday Event:

http://www.lifetime-media.com/sbjmentoringmondayevent

The Giving Tree

Over the years we've had the pleasure of working with some wonderful non profit and faith based organizations. Nothing pleases us more than giving a helping hand to those who help others. Take a look at some of the organizations we've worked with and read about their cause, their purpose, and how video helped take their giving to new heights.

 

PARAQUAD

Who is Paraquad?

Paraquad has been empowering people with disabilities for more than 45 years. Our tagline — The Disability Experts — is more than just a catchy slogan. More than 100 employees are working hard every day to change the conversation about disabilities in St. Louis. In 2015, Paraquad provided services to more than 3,100 people with disabilities in the St. Louis region.  

See our Paraquad video here: http://www.lifetime-media.com/paraquad-client-stories

Learn more about Paraquad by visiting their site! http://www.paraquad.org/about/mission-vision-values

 

CONCORDIA SEMINARY

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Who is Concordia?


Concordia Seminary serves church and world by providing theological education and leadership centered in the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ for the formation of pastors, missionaries, deaconesses, scholars, and leaders in the name of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod.

Watch our Concordia video:  http://www.lifetime-media.com/concordia-highlight

Learn more about Concordia here:  http://www.csl.edu/about-us/
 

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

Who is AHA?

The American Heart Association works to help kids, families and communities live heart-healthy lives.

Learn more here: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Affiliate/What-We-Do-in-Missouri_UCM_425540_SubHomePage

Want to hear more? Check out our AHA video: http://www.lifetime-media.com/aha-mlk-health-fair-2015

Hi, Eric—

I just wanted to send you a note that the Get to Goal video that you and your staff put together for me has been viewed by our National Headquarters, and they are using it as a model for all videos going forward! You rock!!
— American Heart Association Midwest Affiliate

What are some of your favorite Non-Profit and Faith Based organizations? Drop their information below! 

Seeing Is Believing

Do You See What I See?

Here at the studio we never want a dull moment in our video vault. From training videos to live events, we strive to keep things interesting without steering away from what each client sees as their desired final product.

As summer comes to a close and leaves begin to change, so do projects and ideas. As a producer, director, videographer, etc., it is important not to remain stagnant in your production approach. How do you stay true to your style, be remembered for your outstanding techniques, but introduce fresh ideas after many years of success? What do you need in order to push yourself to new professional heights?

Since the beginning, CEO Eric Habert has been a strong believer in pre-production. It is important to know what you're doing, why you're doing it, who's your audience, and what separates the client from their competitors. What is the video trying to say or do? Being thorough during the production stage allows your production team to push a style that is best for achieving the client's goals. It's not necessarily all about the flashy looks. It depends on the goal. The clients goal coupled with creative interest and experience will dictate what the style is best. Sometimes what's best for that particular project is terrible for something else. Knowing your client and trusting your own ideas are key while continuing to elevate your craft and produce the best product for your client.

62% of consumers are more likely to have a negative perception of brand that published a poor quality video
— Brightcove

Lifetime Media producer Kyle Jeffery also makes it a point to be thorough during the pre-production stage. As a producer it is imperative that you ask the client up front what they see their project to be. Generally, answers are very vague. Most clients know they want a video and they want it by a certain date; the creative direction however, is the production team's job.

"Honestly, it depends on the client. Some may want a specific look and would rather not try new things. I try to my break up angles of shooting, ask more interview questions, move things around on set, make it less traditional with each new project. It helps to steer away from a controlled atmosphere and mix up the style. Once you change the way you see things, your creative eye does as well."

From a videographer's stand point, Lifetime Media shooter Andy Wilkins has a different view on things.

"It does truly depend on the client. It's about them and their goal but they do fully rely on you as a professional. To help meet their goal I shift gears to their needs. Most times to keep things fresh I try new technical things. Using different types of camera equipment, new cameras, reviewing my favorite director or producer's style of work, soaking up other styles I've never seen and using it as stepping stones to recreate a video in my own way helps me refrain from being stagnant in my work."                                                                                  -Andy Wilkins

"It does truly depend on the client. It's about them and their goal but they do fully rely on you as a professional. To help meet their goal I shift gears to their needs. Most times to keep things fresh I try new technical things. Using different types of camera equipment, new cameras, reviewing my favorite director or producer's style of work, soaking up other styles I've never seen and using it as stepping stones to recreate a video in my own way helps me refrain from being stagnant in my work."                                                                                  -Andy Wilkins

Here at Lifetime Media we are fortunate to have a team of highly skilled workers that know how to keep things interesting. It's about paying attention to detail in pre-production, creating a new atmosphere on set, remembering what works for you and your production team, but most importantly knowing your client. These things combined help make the quality video your clients need.

When you work with Lifetime Media, you can count on a well-organized team led by owners Eric and Abraham. Their team always brings its A-Game: talented, focused and flexible…they are a pleasure to work with. As a client, they make you feel like they’ve got your back throughout the production process. Whether it’s animation, video editing, or cinematography, I’ve always been comfortable trusting Eric, Abraham and their crew with my most critical projects.

Lifetime’s facilities are excellent: a large studio space that can be prepped for just about any type of shoot, plus editing suites that are comfortable and spacious. They are always ready to tailor their resources and facilities to suit your needs. On location, they demonstrate the utmost professionalism, and are quick and efficient.

To sum it up, Lifetime Media will create a video that achieves your goals, and meets your budget. Eric, Abraham, and their entire team bring an enthusiastic attitude to the work, and they are fun to work with. One really can’t ask for much more when looking for a video production partner. I’ve worked with Lifetime since 2007, and I highly recommend them!

-Albert R. Dowbnia

Director of Digital Media Production
The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod

 

What do you do to stay creative?

-The Arborist at Lifetime Media

Sixteen Rings

Welcome to "The Tree Blog"

Here at Lifetime Media we strive to make life in the video production industry easier. From booking projects to finalizing minor details in post production, it is important that we give partners, employees, companies, and each individual family member our all.

As we reach our 16th year in business and fall begins, we wanted to start showing our appreciation by introducing something new; a change in season if you will.

The Tree Blog is a little extension of our work. Every week we will be giving you blasts from the past, insight on our production technique, words from our CEO, shooting and editing advice, and more.

You may have noticed our logo.

LTM Tree.png

Why the tree?

Like a tree, all production companies may look the same, but as Lifetime Media continues to grow, thrive, change, weather the storms, and age, over the past 16 years we've become very unique. We are not flashy, considered to be the coolest kids on the block, have offices that rival the local hip hangout BUT we've been offering an experience that is professional, on target, consistent, and surprisingly affordable for 16 exciting years.

The tree represents our entrepreneurial spirit. Take care of the tree and the tree will take care of us. The tree provides fruit, shelter and stability for us and our clients. Innovation is also in the tree as it will continue to grow becoming more rooted but also new branches will sprout. To stay in balance the right branches shall be pruned and the others allowed to reach the sky.

Allow us to get cheesy here for a second. We may not be your real family, but like a tree and it's roots, we know the importance of a solid foundation. Our solid foundation is the Lifetime Media family. This includes our team and yours.

As we celebrate another year in business, we will continue to pursue long term partnerships, remember our core values, stand firm in our purpose, and to be your easy source for creative, consistent video communications for your company, family, or organization.

More importantly, the tree reminds us where we come from and who will come from us.

From our family to yours,

Thank you for 16 years of business. Here's to 16 more years of making life easier.

-The Lifetime Media Family

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